Tag: Peace

The Poor, The President, and the Bible

[I was impressed with this blog.  It pulls together a number of things I have been considering recently about being a Christian in America. —David Alleman]

living in GRACEland

I’m going to be honest with you – the past couple years have been really disheartening for me as a believer and follower of Jesus. Not because of Jesus – no, Jesus is more dear to me now than ever before. As I get older and spend year after year getting to know Jesus better, I am completely overwhelmed by His perfect marriage of justice and mercy, by His unconditional love, by His lavish mercy, by His invitation to everyone everywhere to follow Him and bask in His love. No, it’s not Jesus who has broken my heart and disappointed me at my very core in a way that is difficult to explain. I have been thinking a lot about Gandhi’s words about Jesus and those who bear His name – (at least these words have been attributed to Gandhi, though he may not have been the one to say…

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Singing justice for the poor: Looking for Anabaptist-flavored worship music

 

I proclaim the power of God: 

You do marvels for your servants;

Though you scatter the proud hearted

And destroy the might of princes.

To the hungry you give food,

send the rich away ——empty.

In your mercy you are mindful

Of the people you have chosen.

Refrain:  And holy is your name through all generations. (verses 2 & 3 “My Soul is Filled With Joy”. #13 Sing the Journey.  See also, “I’ll praise my maker while I’ve breath” verses 2 and 3 Hymnal, a worship book – HWB #166)

Where can we find similar praise to God for caring for the poor and hungry in contemporary and traditional worship music?  The results of the search I’ve done show few examples of helping the marginal and bringing down the powerful in praise and worship music.   Early 2015 the Mountain States Mennonite Conference concluded an Anabaptist songwriting contest. They asked for “New songs with lyrics that espouse Anabaptist/Mennonite values:  (e.g. Non-violence, love for enemy, reconciliation, communal life, etc.), musically spanning from traditional forms to non-traditional genres, styles and cultural expressions.” Specific mention of the social justice theme is not made, but perhaps it is implied in “Anabaptist/Mennonite values”.  The link below identifies winners and includes their lyrics and music.  One of the six mentions attention to the poor. *  The 2015 Mennonite World Conference Songbook, Walking with God includes at least three of fifty-six selections that specifically praise God for his attention to the oppressed and poor.  January 4, 2016, MennoMedia announced Project 606, intended to produce a new hymnal by 2020.  Will this project include work on identifying elements of Anabaptist-flavored, Bible-based worship music?

 Biblical sources

What Biblical models warrant placing a strong emphasis on praising God for social justice, especially in praise music?  “Social justice” here is short hand for God’s act in delivering an immigrant/slave people from the super power of the day.  It is a social act because a group of people, the children of Israel, was rescued. A new people with a new plan for living (the Torah) were established. God’s rescue of an oppressed people was “just” because it showed God’s love and mercy, not because Jacob’s descendants deserved it.

The contest (see above) reminded me of my quest of some years to find references to discipleship in worship music, narrowed here to social justice. After some 40 years of hearing loss,  hearing aids no longer helped.  My cochlear implant is engineered to help with the hertz range of conversation level, but does not cover high and low notes of music.  So, I give my attention to the words of the song.  This has led me to ask questions about the theology behind the music used in worship. As a non-musician I make no claim to expertise in evaluating musical quality of any of the songs mentioned.  I need a welcome help in identifying the quality of lyrics and music featuring attention to God’s interest in the oppressed.

What I have learned

Worship music in the evangelical churches I am familiar with usually includes what can be categorized loosely as contemporary Christian music (CCM), traditional hymns, and gospel songs.  These types of music have some overlap.  I am not going to define each type.  Each has its focus.  Contemporary and traditional music praise God for many attributes and deeds, give many invitations for rededication to Christian living, and rejoice in the promise of future life with God, but seldom on concern for the poor and oppressed.  My focus on the marginalized in this essay is very narrow.

Christian contemporary music

Several writers have noted the lack of attention to social justice issues in CCM. Jay Howard writes: “There are few [contemporary Christian worship] songs concerned with social justice because there are few songwriters from the Anabaptist tradition.”  He analyzes 77 Contemporary Worship Songs –those most frequently requested of the licensing service CCL–and finds only one that gives direct attention to social justice issues.  John L. Bell, songwriter argues that CCM is mainly about the birth and death of Jesus and ignores his life.  Have I missed some CCM titles that give attention to Jesus’ life, especially to his attention to the poor, the widow, and the outsider?

Traditional ‘gospel songs’ and hymns

Praise and thanksgiving in traditional hymns and gospel songs (I will not define these here, but look at the section on “Gospel Songs” Mennonite Hymnal for examples) give little attention to social justice.  “Gospel songs” are strong in their emphasis on grace, God/Jesus’ companionship and love.  I have not found any of these that praise God for his love and care of the “widow and fatherless”.  There are a number of hymns in HWB, that include an interest in the poor and oppressed and justice for them.  One that honors God for this attention is “I’ll Praise My Maker”, verses three and four (HWB, #166).  Some encourage us to follow Jesus’ example in caring for the marginalized.  Did I miss hymns that specifically praise God/Jesus as Miriam and Mary did for God’s championing of the oppressed?

Models and sources:

The preliminary Biblical models I would propose for praise songs are Miriam’s song (Exodus 15) and Mary’s song in Luke 1. The book of Psalms was Israel’s “praise and worship” book.  That requires some attention to psalms that praise God for his attention to disadvantaged and those who prey on them.

 

Miriam’s Song

While God the warrior image usually makes Anabaptist uncomfortable, God is first called holy when he rescued the Israelites from the Egyptian cavalry and foot soldiers.

Who is like you, O Lord, among the gods?
Who is like you?—majestic in holiness, fearful in praises, working wonders?
 You stretched out your right hand,
the earth swallowed them. (Ex. 15:11-12 (New English Translation)

God is praised for delivering the immigrant/slaves God chose to become his covenant people.

The Psalms

In his work on the Psalms, Walter Brueggemann says that the things we praise God for shows the way we view the world and our place in it.  Many Psalms praise God (see also Miriam’s Song) for delivering a slave/immigrant people from the Egyptian superpower whose religion favored politically powerful and the rich. We are sometimes tempted to assign God’s action here to a special category, rather than see it as a model of what God does.  Psalmists praise God (and kings) for their concern for the poor and marginalized.  God is praised for being a just judge and for making wars cease.  See the following Psalms: 9, 10, 29, 35, 65, 66, 68, 69, 72, 74, 81, 82, 94, 96, 97, 98, 99, 102, 103, 105,106, 107, 109, 123, 124, 135, 136, 139, 140, 146.

 Phrases from Psalms 72 and 146 capture a king’s and God’s attitude and action and are characteristic of the other Psalms:

Ps. 72:  The King:

— takes pity on the weak and the needy
—  saves the needy from death.
rescues them from oppression and violence,
— for precious is their blood in his sight.

Ps. 146.  The Lord

–upholds the cause of the oppressed
–gives food to the hungry.
–sets prisoners free,
gives sight to the blind,
— lifts up those who are bowed down,
— loves the righteous.
watches over the foreigner
–sustains the fatherless and the widow,
–frustrates the ways of the wicked

Praise the Lord.

Repeatedly God gives attention to the oppressed and provides security and safety to victims of violence.  To what extent should words and phrases like these from the Psalms be present in our worship music?

 Prophets

Attention to the needs of the orphan/widow/poor is identified more with prophets than the Psalms and I was pleased to find significant attention to this topic in the Psalms.  Prophetic critiques of worship do not contain comments on purity of sacrifices, social justice content of Psalms or the quality or frequency of Psalm recitation.  The prophetic critiques point out that Sabbath worship by the people of the covenant should be reflected in covenant behavior during the week.

Mary, Jesus, Paul

These themes are continued in the New Testament.  Mary’s prophetic vision of her son’s work is captured in the song “My Soul is Filled With Joy”. (#13, Sing the Journey, verses 2 and 3 above).  Jesus inaugural sermon repeats these themes.

Miriam’s Song, many Psalms, the prophets’ reminders all tell us that connecting worship and living is crucial.   The New Testament contributions of Mary’s song, Jesus life and teaching, and Paul’s take on worship in Romans 12 all point to the worship-discipleship-concern for poor and marginalized as an essential element in our praise and life.  I have found very few songs in CCM and “gospel songs” with this focus and only a few in traditional hymns that praise God as a champion of the down and out.  (Perhaps additional research and help from knowledgeable persons will locate songs with a social justice focus.)  Eugene Peterson’s (The Message) take on Psalms 65:1 provides an appropriate conclusion:

Silence is praise to you,
Zion-dwelling God,
And also obedience.
You hear the prayer [praise] in it all.

(My emphasis.)

 

*Text and music of six winners can be found at:

http://www.anabaptistsongwritingchallenge.org/

 

Thanks to Julia H. Alleman and Ray E. Horst for sharing their music knowledge with me.

Revised from an essay previously posted on Compost & Grace

 

David Alleman

Nov. 27, 2016

                                                                                                                             

 

Daniel and the wisdom prophet, Part 3: Reading Daniel today

How do we read Daniel?

Many Mennonites have preferred the “calendarizer” -Vernard Eller’s term- approach to the book of Daniel and its “prophecies”.   In doing so they have emphasized the chronological connection between events in the fashion of the diviners and astrologers.  This approach neglects the ethical connection between events in prophetic utterance:  good deeds will bring blessing, evil deeds bring curses.  Others have joined the modern trend of casting the wisdom prophet into the ivory tower of apocalypticism and throwing away the key.  By declaring Daniel “apocalyptic”  the prophetical/ethical dimension has been of the book has been blunted.

The “proto-constantinianism” of the Maccabees has been the key to interpretation of the political relevance of Daniel for both protestants and Catholics. (see Harrington, The Biblical Model for Revolution).  These interpreters agree with the book of the Maccabees that revolutionary violence and state violence are necessary to protect the people of God and punish evil.

Although Mennonites have focused on the ethical dimension of the Christian faith, they have not given much attention to this dimension of Daniel.  The Mennonite Encyclopedia. does not contain an article on Daniel, in spite of the importance of Daniel to many of the era of the editors of ME.   [There is mention of Daniel in the article on “chiliasm”.]  That Daniel was of importance to the early Anabaptists, such as the Munsterites, has not increased the appeal of Daniel.  The disputes between the premillennialists and amillennialists and their use of Daniel to create timelines has detracted from viewing the ethical aspect of the wisdom prophet’s ethical teaching. There have been no interpretative articles on Daniel in the Gospel Herald/Mennonite since at least 1960, if my research is correct.  I have searched the indexes back to 1960 and talked to former editors, Dan Hertzler and John Drescher.  (The Believers’ Church commentary on Daniel was published after I began this study.)

This essay proposes that we expect the wisdom prophet, as other prophets, to provide practical guidance on a current issue of the day, not simply children’s rescue stories or timetables for the distant future.  For our day also, when evil people arise, the wisdom prophet’s stories can encourage us to faithfulness to God and trust in him.  In the face of oppression and persecution, many have chosen the Maccabean way of violent resistance, rather than the wisdom prophet’s way of faithfulness and suffering.  From the Münsterites of the Anabaptist era to the Branch Davidians of Waco, Texas and liberation theologians today, people read the book of Daniel as if it supported the Maccabees, rather than opposed them.

Many followers of God have insisted that God’s people need the state and state violence for their preservation of Christian values.  Christians rooted in the Cold War era saw the United States’ nuclear weapons as a necessity for the survival of Christianity.  Christians have encouraged the Israelis to believe that only by military superiority will they be spared another Holocaust.  In the post-9/11 world, Christians have insisted that the evil of terrorism will only be overcome by violence.  How can people of peace encourage others to let the angel Michael (Dan 10:13) and the Son of Man deal with the enemies of the people of God?  Following Daniel’s example, we can choose the way of suffering, prayer, and the wisdom of trusting God.

——————————————

Waiting on God

 

An exploration of the peace witness of the first (old) testament

 The Psalmist counsels us “wait on the Lord”! What do you think of or imagine yourself doing in response to this counsel? In what situations have you recalled passages from the Bible that include this phrase? In the passages below, what is the context of the word “wait” or “waiting”? For me, passages with this word have suggested prayer and meditation. Is this made explicit in the text? What is the alternative to “waiting”? What more than prayer in suggested by “waiting”? How often does the “waiting” command come in the context of violence? What is the significance of this?

16 The king is not saved by his great army;
a warrior is not delivered by his great strength.
17 The war horse is a false hope for salvation,
and by its great might it cannot rescue.

18 Behold, the eye of the Lord is on those who fear him,
on those who hope in his steadfast love,
19 that he may deliver their soul from death
and keep them alive in famine.

20 Our soul waits for the Lord;
he is our help and our shield.
21 For our heart is glad in him,
because we trust in his holy name.
22 Let your steadfast love, O Lord, be upon us,
even as we hope in you. Psalm 33: 16-22

14 The wicked draw the sword and bend their bows
to bring down the poor and needy,
to slay those whose way is upright;
15 their sword shall enter their own heart,
and their bows shall be broken.

32 The wicked watches for the righteous
and seeks to put him to death.
33 The Lord will not abandon him to his power
or let him be condemned when he is brought to trial.

34 Wait for the Lord and keep his way,
and he will exalt you to inherit the land;
you will look on when the wicked are cut off. Psalm 37:(5-9) 14-15, 32-34

See below for a list of similar passages*

Psalm 33 use of the word “wait” is preceded by description of violence against the people of God. (“Whether the king is to use his great army or not is not clarified.) Action of God’s people is not needed. Waiting leads to affirmation of God’s presence and control of the situation. Note the words “help”, “trust”, “hope” as helper words for “wait”.

In Psalm 37 the situation is bleak. Not just the people of God are the target of the forces of evil, but specifically “the poor and needy”. Violence is what evil people do. The people of God “wait” and “keep his way”. Keeping God’s way refers to covenant/Torah behavior. In the end “the wicked [will be] cut off”.

Is this part of Paul’s source for “Vengeance is mine, says the Lord” (Rom. 12:19 with Deut. 32:35)? How is Paul’s reminder related to the need to wait? Note surrounding the “vengeance” command we are encouraged to “love”, “seek peace”, and “feed” [your] enemy”. Here we have some of the things from the life and teachings of Jesus that are to the focus the people of God while waiting for God to act.

For further thought:  The “First” Testament basis for the peace understanding of Anabaptists needs additional exploration. There is much violence found in the First Testament.   The New Testament affirms the contrasting thread lifted out here that calls for us to wait on God. From God comes protection and vengeance/justice.

*Similar passages are:  Psalm 25:1-5, Psalm 27: 11-14, Psalm 62:1-7 (See also, Psalm 40:1-3—no suggestion of violence in this passage), Psalm 130:1-6, Proverbs 20:22, Lamentations 3:13-26, Isaiah 30:15-18 (the word “rest” is used in this passage), Micah 7:2-3, 7; Isaiah 40:28-31 (God has just “rescued” Israel from Babylon), Isa. 64:1-4, Zephaniah 3:8

Related concept:

“The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still” (Exodus 14:14).

Before You Punch a Nazi: A New Anabaptist Response to White Supremacy

Before You Punch a Nazi: A New Anabaptist Response to White Supremacy

gathering the stones

There isn’t much to be surprised by in Charlottesville. There’s much to grieve, but none of it should be a surprise. All the elements of Saturday’s events have been in headlines for months, or years, and they are quintessential to this time: cars swerving into crowds; statues of Confederate warriors being removed; white nationalist rallies; Black Lives Matter; pedestrians injured. As if someone scrambled up bits of headlines until it yielded this.

What do we do now? Grief wants comfort. Comfort is action. We want to do something. We have to do something.

[Edit: The original draft of this post faced valid criticism for a why-can’t-we-all-get-along, syrup-y vision of white-Anabaptist heroism. A revised post, with this feedback in mind, is forthcoming in the Mennonite World Review. White Anabaptists have their own history of racism. Critiques of anti-oppression work are meaningless if they are veiled excuses for our own racism…

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Tax yourself: July 2017 Post

Discover the Voluntary Tax Fund

Hey, there’s $1.95 gas at Pilot (or Sheetz, etc.)! your spouse or friend tells you. Or, do you use Gas Buddy to locate the best price? Frugality, of course is recommended and not the issue of interest here.

Recently, my nephew’s wife missed a family gathering to go to Venezuela to help her mother get medical help for a heart condition. Finding the medicine she needed was difficult due to rapid inflation. That was a result, in part from corruption, but also due to the dropping price of oil.

A friend has been in South Sudan doing trauma relief with refugees from the religious/ethnic war with (North) Sudan. Much of the funds for the relief funds for food and housing come from government revenue from oil income. Gas buyers in Europe pay$5.00 or more for gas. Money going to the military, in effect, subsidizes the artificially low cost of automobile gas.

What can we do? Tax ourselves! Use the funds for energy saving projects. My favorites were solar panels for Gift & Thrift and Bicycles for Refugees. Here’s additional information from the website:

Gas Tax Club – Home

www.voluntarygastax.org

Totally voluntary! Or a tax that you can decide to … The Voluntary Gas Tax is a campaign that was initiated in November of 2000 by a group of concerned citizens in Harrisonburg, VA.

“Here’s where our tax has gone so far:

  • $50 to buy bicycle lights for the guys in a local half-way house
  • $368 for an 8 foot bike trailer for a local university to use as a recycle vehicle
  • $450 for earthquake victims in Pakistan
  • $500 to Blacks Run Greenway Partnership, a local group planning and promoting a bike path/walking trail as a linear park along a stream through our town.”

For another example:

Voluntary Tax Dollars shade Goshen Streets

http://www.mennocreationcare.org/voluntary-gas-tax-dollars…

This project does not solve the basic problem. Participation in the voluntary gas tax action reminds us we must still deal with our use/overuse of irreplaceable resources.

 

Peter and Peace

John 13:36-14:4

Sometimes we see a scripture passage in a new way. That happened to me not long ago. (Remember, the gospel writer John did not put in chapter divisions.) Read these verses together.

John 13 36 Simon Peter asked, “Lord, where are you going?”  And Jesus replied, “You can’t go with me now, but you will follow me later.”  37 “But why can’t I come now, Lord?” he asked. “I’m ready to die for you.”  38 Jesus answered, “Die for me? I tell you the truth, Peter—before the rooster crows tomorrow morning, you will deny three times that you even know me.  14:1“Don’t let your hearts be troubled. Trust in God, and trust also in me. There is more than enough room in my Father’s home. If this were not so, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? When everything is ready, I will come and get you, so that you will always be with me where I am. And you know the way to where I am going.” [New Living Translation].

Connection Peter’s words & Jesus’

What connection does Jesus expect the disciples to see between Peter’s “die for you” announcement and Jesus’ assurance that they could trust God, trust Jesus and remember the welcome to be found in the Father’s House?  How do his activities in the Garden help us understand what he means here? (Jn. 18:11, Mt. 26:52) What kind of misunderstanding of Jesus way does Peter show earlier leading Jesus to call him “satan”? (Mt. 16:23)

What did Peter mean to do while “dying” for Jesus?  Didn’t Peter intend to do more than die? His likely heroes are the Maccabees* who liberated Judah from the Syrian Seleucid oppression some 150 years earlier. They used similar language to support their military activity, believing that they achieved some kind of redemption through death defending the land and people of God.   They did defeat the Syrians, freeing Jerusalem and re-establishing pure worship.

On the other hand, opposing the violence of the Maccabees, the editor/writer of the Daniel stories and visions focused on activities that upheld the covenant, encouraged repentance and continued faithful worship, but showed a willingness to defy oppressive rulers. Daniel and friends were willing face death (Dan. 3:17-18) as did the Maccabees, but did not turn to violence. As Daniel 12:3 puts it:

“Those who are wise will shine as bright as the sky, and those who lead many to righteousness will shine like the stars forever.”

The “wisdom teacher” who wrote of Daniel and friends would have understood the connection between “trusting God” and “more than enough room in my Father’s home”. The way of peace could lead to death. Those “rooms” were especially for disciples who were willing to follow Jesus’s command. Reading first Peter confirms that Peter had moved away from the Maccabean idea that one could gain redemption through death against the enemies of God. He understood the words of Jesus:

You have heard the law that says, ‘Love your neighbor’ and hate your enemy. But I say, love your enemies! Pray for those who persecute you! In that way, you will be acting as true children of your Father in heaven. Mt. 5:43-47 (New Living Translation)

*The Maccabees became active around 163 BC. The Seleucids, an empire headquartered in Syria for some years tortured, killed, sold Jews into slavery and burned of copies of the Torah. In response, a family of five sons, later called the Maccabees, led a rebellion against them. After several years of war and with an alliance with the Roman Empire, the Maccabees (later known as the Hasmonians, their family name) overthrew the Syrians and set up a free Hebrew state. The last of the Hasmonians was a wife of Herod the Great of New Testament times.

June Notes

Peace prayer for June/July

Pray for the peaceful reunification of North & South Korea. Pray that the food aid the Mennonite Central Committee provides North Korea may show the love of Jesus for all people. — Washington Memo Vol. XLIX, No. 2

Showing compassion is one way to promote reunification.  The Mennonite Central Committee has sent food to North Korea for nearly 20 years.  MCC has provided medical supplies and supported orphanages, also.

The above was taken from the Washington Memo Vol. XLIX, No. 2.  For more information, check out:

washington.mcc.org  or read the blog at washingtonmemo.org

 

Waiting for God

The Psalmist counsels us “wait on the Lord”! What do you think of or imagine yourself doing in response to this counsel? In what situations have you recalled passages from the Bible that include this phrase? In the passages below, what is the context of the word “wait” or “waiting”? In the past I have thought of “waiting” as suggesting prayer and meditation. Is this made explicit in the text?

For the subjects of the Psalm, what would be the alternative to “waiting”? What more than prayer in suggested by “waiting”? How often does the “waiting” command come in the context of violence? What is the significance of this?

Psalm 33:  16-22

16 The king is not saved by his great army;
a warrior is not delivered by his great strength.
17 The war horse is a false hope for salvation,
and by its great might it cannot rescue.

18 Behold, the eye of the Lord is on those who fear him,
on those who hope in his steadfast love,
19 that he may deliver their soul from death
and keep them alive in famine.

20 Our soul waits for the Lord;
he is our help and our shield.
21 For our heart is glad in him,
because we trust in his holy name.
22 Let your steadfast love, O Lord, be upon us,
even as we hope in you.

Psalm 37:(5-9) 14-15, 32-34

14 The wicked draw the sword and bend their bows
to bring down the poor and needy,
to slay those whose way is upright;
15 their sword shall enter their own heart,
and their bows shall be broken.

32 The wicked watches for the righteous
and seeks to put him to death.
33 The Lord will not abandon him to his power
or let him be condemned when he is brought to trial.

34 Wait for the Lord and keep his way,
and he will exalt you to inherit the land;
you will look on when the wicked are cut off.

(See below for a list of similar passages*)

In Psalm 33 use of the word “wait” is preceded by description of violence against the people of God. (“Whether the king is to use his great army or not is not clarified.) Action by God’s people is not needed. Waiting leads to affirmation of God’s presence and control of the situation. Note the words “help”, “trust”, “hope” as helper words for “wait”.

In Psalm 37 the situation is bleak. Not just the people of God are the target of the forces of evil, but specifically “the poor and needy”. Violence is what evil people do. In the end “the wicked [will be] cut off”. The people of God “wait” and “keep his way”. Keeping God’s way (v. 34) refers to covenant/Torah behavior. In Isaiah 40, the setting is a bit different. While in these Psalms there is the implication that God will overpower the enemy or the evil Hebrews, that is not as clear in Isa.40:28-31. Is the vindication of the “suffering servant” what one is to wait for?  (See my blog on Isa. 40, “Exodus to Exile”)

Waiting and then what?

Are these “wait” passages behind Paul’s instructions in Romans 12:19 and following? “Vengeance is mine, says the Lord” (Rom. 12:19 with Deut. 32:35)? How is Paul’s reminder related to the need to wait? The normal response to violence is vengeance.  Note surrounding the “vengeance” command we are encouraged to “love”, “seek peace”, and “feed” [your] enemy”. Here we have some of the things from the life and teachings of Jesus that are to the focus the people of God while waiting for God to act.

The “First” Testament basis for the peace understanding of Anabaptists needs further exploration. While there is much violence found in the first testament, the new testament affirms the contrasting thread lifted out here that calls for us to wait on God. From God comes protection and vengeance/justice.

 

*Similar passages are:  Psalm 25:1-5, Psalm 27: 11-14, Psalm 62:1-7 (See also, Psalm 40:1-3—no suggestion of violence in this passage), Psalm 130:1-6, Proverbs 20:22, Lamentations 3:13-26, Isaiah 30:15-18 (the word “rest” is used in this passage), Micah 7:2-3, 7; Isaiah 40:28-31 (God has just “rescued” Israel from Babylon), Isa. 64:1-4, Zephaniah 3:8

Related concept:

“The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still” (Exodus 14:14).